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Hitachi America, Ltd.

Hitachi

3/5/2007

Hitachi’s Finger Vein Authentication Technology Selected by Shinkin Central Bank (SCB) New York Branch

--First Access Control System Employing Hitachi Vascular Authentication Technology in the United States --

NEW YORK, www.hitachi.us, March 5, 2007- Hitachi America, Ltd., Security Solutions Group, today announced that Hitachi’s access control system employing its vascular authentication technology has been adopted for access control system (*1) at the New York Branch office of Shinkin Central Bank (President and Chief Executive Officer: Kosuke Nakahira/SCB, General Manager of New York Branch: Kazuhito Harada) . The application is the first access control system in United States that is using Hitachi’s finger vein authentication technology.

The New York Branch of Shinkin Central Bank began operating in a new location on February 20 and decided to employ the new Hitachi technology based on the ease of implementation and the accuracy of the technology. Hitachi’s vascular biometric access control system is implemented in the trading room, the operation room and the server room. When entering a room, an ID number is entered into a keypad, and the finger is placed on a reader for validation of the vascular pattern. Upon confirmation, entry to the room is permitted. Employing this type of biometric device eliminates the need for keys or cards.

The finger vein authentication system business of Hitachi up until the present time has focused on the Japanese market for applications such as ATMs for financial institutions, fast becoming the de-facto standard. It also is beginning to find growing use in PC access and building entry. Markets in Southeast Asia are also seeing application of the technology, particularly in Singapore. To further promote the technology, Hitachi, Ltd. established "Finger Vein Authentication Business Centers" in the United States, Europe, Singapore and China. Hitachi’s goal is to make its finger vein technology solution a de- facto standard for high-security authentication.

Feature and mechanism of finger vein authentication system
Hitachi’s finger vein technology is able to read the unique pattern of veins inside the finger. And because the vein is internal to the body, disguising the vein pattern is virtually impossible, making counterfeiting improbable. Critical to the technology is the use of light, which penetrates the finger, illuminating the unique vascular pattern. The methodology allows the identification of the pattern without touching the sensor directly. Moreover, the device is compact, and can be applied in many areas for access control and authentication such as for PC login, residence and vehicle entry and ATMs. For further information, please visit http://www.hitachi.co.jp/Prod/comp/fingervein/global/index.html

About Hitachi
Hitachi America, Ltd., a subsidiary of Hitachi, Ltd., markets and manufactures a broad range of electronics, computer systems and products, and consumer electronics, and provides industrial equipment and services throughout North America. For more information, visit http://www.hitachi.us.

Hitachi, Ltd., (NYSE: HIT / TSE: 6501), headquartered in Tokyo, Japan, is a leading global electronics company with approximately 356,000 employees worldwide. Fiscal 2005 (ended March 31, 2006) consolidated sales totaled 9,464 billion yen ($80.9 billion). The company offers a wide range of systems, products and services in market sectors including information systems, electronic devices, power and industrial systems, consumer products, materials and financial services. For more information on Hitachi, please visit the company's website at http://www.hitachi.com.

Shinkin banks are cooperative financial institutions. Their membership is composed of local residents and small and medium-sized companies. Shinkin banks' distinctive characteristics are (1) they are close and convenient, (2) they offer fine-tuned and personalized services and (3) they have a strong relationship of mutual trust with their customers and communities.

*1) The device is made by Hitachi Information & Control Solutions, Ltd.

Contacts
Gerard F. Corbett
Hitachi America, Ltd., Branding and Corp. Communications Group
650.244.7900
gerard.corbett@hal.hitachi.com

Tadashi Hisanaga
Hitachi America, Ltd., Branding and Corp. Communications Group
650.244.7909
tadashi.hisanaga@hal.hitachi.com